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Talk:Directory:Fellows Thermoacoustic Cycle (TAC) Generator

Lasted edited by Andrew Munsey, updated on June 14, 2016 at 9:31 pm.

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Discussion page for Directory:Fellows Thermoacoustic Cycle (TAC) Generator.

Image:MEMS-TAR Fellows chip 95x95.jpg

Texas inventor's technology uses heat to amplify acoustic waves (sound waves) in a high pressure gas, which drive a linear generator and produce electric power. The system can allegedly be built at a very low cost. (http://www.io.com/~frg/)

Comments

Excellent Conventional Science

On July 12, 2004, (now) New Energy Congress member, Congress:Advisor:Kenneth M. Rauen wrote:

This is an excellent application of conventional science. It has tremendous potential for cheaply utilizing low temperature heat. It is Carnot-limited, but the device is simple and cheap to make and can produce electricity from heat sources that usually are ignored. It is probably a Stirling cycle. Piston Stirlings are usually somewhat high tech and costly. Thermoacoustics has the potential to be far simpler and cheaper, and these people seem to have a good idea.

Low Efficiency

electrique527 wrote on July 23, 2008 on YouTube

"Problem with these engines / converters is the very low efficiency. They are simply no match for the existing stirling engines, even though those are more complex.

Also, your presentation is incorrect in places, very one sided, and almost misleading in other parts. The technology is good, but not as rosy as you make it here."

Excellent Conventional Science

On July 12, 2004, (now) New Energy Congress member, Congress:Advisor:Kenneth M. Rauen wrote:

This is an excellent application of conventional science. It has tremendous potential for cheaply utilizing low temperature heat. It is Carnot-limited, but the device is simple and cheap to make and can produce electricity from heat sources that usually are ignored. It is probably a Stirling cycle. Piston Stirlings are usually somewhat high tech and costly. Thermoacoustics has the potential to be far simpler and cheaper, and these people seem to have a good idea.

Comments