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PowerPedia:l

Lasted edited by Andrew Munsey, updated on June 14, 2016 at 10:13 pm.

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The litre (spelled liter in There was an error working with the wiki: Code[9]) is a unit of There was an error working with the wiki: Code[10]. There are two official symbols: lowercase l and uppercase L. The litre is not an SI unit but is accepted for use with the SI. The SI unit of volume is the cubic Metre (m&sup3).

Definition

1 L = 1 l := 1/1000 m³ = 1 dm³

SI multiples

{|class="wikitable"

! Multiple

! Name

! colspan=2|Symbols

!

! Multiple

! Name

! colspan=2|Symbols

|-

|100

| litre

|l ||L

|

|&nbsp

|&nbsp

|&nbsp

|-

|101

| decalitre

|dal||daL

|

|10–1

| decilitre

|dl||dL

|-

|102

| hectolitre

| hl ||hL

|

|10–2

| centilitre

| cl ||cL

|-

|103

| kilolitre

|kl ||kL

|

|10–3

| millilitre

| ml ||mL

|-

|106

| megalitre

|Ml ||ML

|

|10–6

| microlitre

| µl || µL

|-

|109

| gigalitre

|Gl ||GL

|

|10–9

| nanolitre

|nl ||nL

|-

|1012

| teralitre

|Tl ||TL

|

|10–12

| picolitre

|pl ||pL

|-

|1015

| petalitre

|Pl ||PL

|

|10–15

| femtolitre

|fl ||fL

|-

|1018

| exalitre

|El ||EL

|

|10–18

| attolitre

|al ||aL

|-

|1021

| zettalitre

| Zl ||ZL

|

|10–21

| zeptolitre

| zl ||zL

|-

|1024

|yottalitre

|Yl ||YL

|

|10–24

| yoctolitre

| yl ||yL

|-

|}

Origin

Its name derived from an older French unit, the There was an error working with the wiki: Code[1], whose name came from Greek via Latin.

Explanation

Litres are most commonly used for items measured by the capacity or size of their container (such as fluids and berries), whereas cubic metres (and derived units) are most commonly used for items measured either by their dimensions or their displacements. The litre is often also used in some calculated measurements, such as density (kg/L), allowing an easy comparison with the density of water.

One litre of water weighs almost exactly one There was an error working with the wiki: Code[11]. Similarly: 1 ml of water weighs about 1 g 1000 litres of water weighs about 1000 kg (1 tonne). This relationship is due to the history of the unit but since 1964 has not been part of the definition.

Symbol

Originally, the only symbol for the litre was l (lowercase letter l), following the SI convention that only those unit symbols that abbreviate the name of a person start with a capital letter.

In many English-speaking countries, the most common shape of a handwritten There was an error working with the wiki: Code[12] 1 is just a vertical stroke, that is it lacks the upstroke added in many other cultures. Therefore, the digit 1 may easily be confused with the letter l. On some typewriters, particularly older ones, the l key had to be used to type the numeral 1. Further, in some typefaces the two characters are nearly indistinguishable. This caused some concern, especially in the medical community. As a result, L (uppercase letter L) was accepted as an alternative symbol for litre in There was an error working with the wiki: Code[13]. The United States There was an error working with the wiki: Code[14] now recommends the use of the uppercase letter L, a practice that is also widely followed in There was an error working with the wiki: Code[15] and There was an error working with the wiki: Code[16]. In these countries, the symbol L is also used with prefixes, as in mL and µL, instead of the traditional ml and µl used in Europe.

Prior to 1979, the symbol &#8467 (script small l, There was an error working with the wiki: Code[2]+2113), came into common use in some countries for example, it was recommended by There was an error working with the wiki: Code[3], the There was an error working with the wiki: Code[17], or any national standards body.

History

In 1793, the litre was introduced in There was an error working with the wiki: Code[18] as one of the new "Republican Measures", and defined as one cubic decimetre.

In 1879, the There was an error working with the wiki: Code[4] adopted the definition of the litre, and the symbol l (lowercase letter l).

In 1901, at the 3rd There was an error working with the wiki: Code[5] conference, the litre was redefined as the space occupied by 1 kg of pure There was an error working with the wiki: Code[6]. This made the litre equal to about 1.000&nbsp028 dm³ (earlier reference works usually put it at 1.000&nbsp027 dm³).

In 1964, at the 12th There was an error working with the wiki: Code[7] conference, the litre was once again defined in exact relation to the metre, as another name for the cubic decimetre, that is, exactly 1 dm³. NIST Reference

In 1979, at the 16th There was an error working with the wiki: Code[8] conference, the alternative symbol L (uppercase letter L) was adopted. It also expressed a preference that in the future only one of these two symbols should be retained, but in 1990 said it was still too early to do so.

See also

PowerPedia:Kilogram

There was an error working with the wiki: Code[19]

External links

BIPM's

BIPM's

NIST note on SI units

NIST recommends uppercase letter L

UK National physical laboratory's

There was an error working with the wiki: Code[20]

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