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OS:Scott F. Hall:Gravity Motor A

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A screen shot of the YouTube video Scott posted demonstrating this gravity motor.
A screen shot of the YouTube video Scott posted demonstrating this gravity motor.

Yet another gizmo by Scott F. Hall, the University Art teacher. On August 6, 2007, after reading up on Bessler's gravity wheel and other designs, he quickly slapped a few things together and came up with what appeared to be a working device.

He sets the wheel on the ground and it appears to roll forward via the simple mechanism he's contrived, using the principles he gathered from his reading.

However, an independent replication of another gravity wheel he built the next day, suggests that there is a gradual incline on his garage floor, which accounts for the rolling motion, rather than it coming from harvesting static gravity.

Image:Scotts garage floor is flat 274.jpg
Level on Scott's garage floor suggests that it is flat, but such gauges are not accurate enough to show the slight incline typical for a garage. [1]

Objective 
The purpose of this PESWiki page was to report on this phenomenon and to encourage validation, characterized, then implemented into a practical application.
Conclusion 
Scott appears to have an incline in his floor, which accounts for the motion observed. This gizmo probably would not work on a level surface.

Contents

About

Official Website

none

We offer this page as a collection of information about his motor.

Latest Developments

Video

  • Scott F. Hall's Gravity Wheel Perpetual Motion Machine - the title chosen by Scott when he posted this at YouTube on August 07, 2007. He sets the wheel on the ground and it rolls forward via the simple mechanism he's constructed. (YouTube)

Comments by Scott Hall

"This one is entirely my own design. I made it after reading conjecture on Bessler and Somerset designs and I decided the whole-wheel approach would be interesting to try." (Aug. 9, 2007) [2]

"That is a flat surface." (Aug. 9, 2007) [3]

"I've had no luck with center axle designs--only these whole-rolling-wheels work for me. If you look at another video of mine called "Bessler ?...", you can see propped against my car tire the 21" width remains of my failed attempt at doing an Edward Somerset style wheel--it formerly had 15 heavy lead weights tied by two cords within each of those "windows". It wouldn't turn long. For now due to frustration, I'm not doing center axle gravity wheels." (Aug. 9, 2007) [4]

Prototype Burned

  • Gravity Wheel Perpetual Motion: Accelerated Entropy - title chosen by Scott in his video post at YouTube.

On Aug. 9, 2007, Scott posted the following comment along with a video showing a level on his garage floor that proves his floor is flat, followed by a view of at least three of his gizmos burning in a heap: Gravity Motor A, B, and his Electrostatic Generator. [5]

"Everyone: Thanks to all who've supported my work, but I do have an artistic temperament: so many destructive comments and so darned much spam has driven me crazy! GOODBYE, clunky prototypes. If/when my patience returns, I'll probably build a wheel that's larger, one that's not crude, and one that is critically bulletproof. Until then, good luck to those of you who possess the positive spirit required to continue this work.
"The floor is flat."

How it Works

On Aug. 7, 2007, Scott wrote: [6]

"I was reading interesting online sources about Johann Bessler and Edward Somerset (a.k.a. the Marquis of Worcester) and it seemed to me that their perpetual motion wheels probably relied upon 1) keeping friction down, 2) keeping a bunch of weights off-axis and 3) keeping more weights on one side than on the other.
"So yesterday, I designed and built this crude gravity wheel from three glued laminations of ¾" plywood, nails for 8 individual axles, several ounces of fishing weights, and clear silicone seal to hold the weights into the 8 drilled-out recesses.
"When I set this wheel with its 90 degree pivoting weights down, off it rolls! Yeah, it hobbles a little--it was just roughed out with a handheld jigsaw and drill.
"I wonder why so many people just assume that self-turning wheels are impossible without first trying to build one?"

Patents

none (his posting this at YouTube prevents it Internationally, either by himself or anyone else)

Replications

Feel free to let us know about any replications. You can edit this site.

post here
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Related Replications

Profiles

Company: None

Inventor: Scott F. Hall

Scott F. Hall is an Associate Professor of Art at the University of Central Florida where he serves as teh Graduate Program Coordinator.

See Directory:Scott F. Hall

Coverage

In the News

  • Gravity Motors > Johannes Bessler Rehabilitated - While the history of overbalancing gravity wheels is spotty, the Bessler Wheel apparently worked well but went to the grave with its inventor. Now the concept seems to have been replicated in two different devices by Scott F. Hall. (Hasslberger Blog; Aug 9, 2007)

Other Coverage

Comments

Related Sites

Other Gravity Motors by Scott Hall

Old Indian Gravity Wheel

  • Finished Indian Perpetual Motion Gravity Wheel - the title chosen by Scott when he posted this at YouTube on Sept. 1, 2007. The video shows wheel axle held by hand, as the wheel apparently accellerates. (YouTube)

See OS:Scott F. Hall:Old Indian Gravity Wheel - Bearings in slanted shafts appear to make the wheel continually off balance.

Gravity Motor B

Scott's first gravity motor, designed the day before the above design, also rolls forward when placed on flat ground via the simple mechanism he's constructed.

  • Scott F. Hall's Gravity Wheel Perpetual Motion Machine - posted by Scott on August 07, 2007. (YouTube)

See OS:Scott F. Hall:Gravity Motor B

Contact

See Directory:Scott F. Hall

See also

- Other Directory listingsLatestA-IJ-RS-ZTreeNews
- PESWiki home page

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