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Directory: Blest Machine recycles plastic back into oil

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Home / experimental version of Blests' waste plastic liquefaction equipment.

by Sterling D. Allan
Pure Energy Systems News
December 17, 2010


New Energy Congress member, Sepp Hasslberger, just informed me about a very cool technology out of Japan called the "Blest Machine" by inventor, Akinori Ito. It converts certain plastics into oil, and it is presently commercially available in sizes ranging from a batch processing, tabletop version for home or experimental use; to larger continuous feed versions for small industrial use.

Basically, you can put plastic items, as they are, into the hopper, and a few minutes later you have the oil from which the plastics were made in the first place.

To operate, you put your plastic trash in a hopper on the machine, then screw on a lid. The temperature inside rises, slowly melting the plastic, which becomes a liquid and then a gas. The key to the process is a regulated electric heater that heats the plastic enough to melt but never to the point where it burns, thus avoiding any CO2 fumes. As the plastic boils, the gaseous fumes are vented into a water bubbler, which cools the gas, resulting in oil floating to the top of the water, due to the natural tendency for water and oil to separate.

Because it doesn't burn the feedstock, the device is safe to use at home.

The resulting oil can be burned as it is, being a crude gas that can fuel things like generators or stoves. Or it can be processed further into gasoline, diesel, or kerosene. There are many fuel efficiency technologies emerging that have a much wider tolerance for the fuel feedstock, while burning the fuel much more efficiently with greatly diminished emissions. It's conceivable that this home plastic-to-oil gadget could enable a person to run their vehicle on plastic they used to throw away. Microproduction of oil – a fuel version of distributed power – becomes a real possibility.

Two pounds of plastic fed to the machine gets you a quart of oil. In metric, one kilogram of plastic produces almost one liter of oil. To convert that amount takes about 1 kilowatt-hour of electricity, which is approximately ¥20 or 20 cents worth.

Blest claims that if the proper materials are fed into the machine (i.e., polyethylene, polystyrene and polypropylene — PP, PE, PS plastics [numbers 2-4]), there is no toxic substance produced, and any residue can be disposed of with regular burnable garbage. PET bottles (number 1) should not be run through their machine. They also explain that while methane, ethane, propane and butane gasses are released in the process, the machine is equipped with an off-gas filter that disintegrates these gases into water and carbon. [1]

One of the issues that will be faced with this technology is the question of what happens to all of the impurities and potentially toxic compounds, like paint, that are left behind when the machine is done turning the plastic into oil. These would have gone into the landfill anyway, but perhaps care could be taken to dispose of them in some other way that prevents the release of the toxins into the environment, by transforming them into something else.

The biggest down-side to the Blest technology is its price. As of November 30, 2010, the improved home plastic-to-oil machine is now ¥106,000 (around US$12,700) without tax. [2] At that price, it is not likely to pay for itself, but early technologies are rarely a break-even proposition. Early adopters, willing to pay more to help the pioneering technology get a foothold in the market, can get social mileage from the good feeling to being part of the solution for what ails our civilization.

As of April, 2009, the company had 60 machines running at farms, fisheries and small factories in Japan and several abroad. [3]

The machine can be transported by plane, and Ito routinely travels around giving demonstrations and educational presentations with the device.

"To make a machine that anyone can use is my dream. The home is the oil field of the future." —Akinori Ito, CEO of Blest.

Contents

Official Website

The site is in Japanese and can be translated by Google or other services. I have the Google Toolbar installed on my browser, and it gives me a button to push on foreign sites, automatically translating the page when I click on it.

Videos

New Inventions: Machine Reverts Plastic Back To Oil (English subtitles)


  • A group in Japan has devised the technology to convert discarded plastics back into oil. One kilogram of plastics, if burned, can produce 3 kilograms of CO2. When reprocessed by the machine, that one kilogram of plastic can yield up to one liter of oil. (YouTube; July 25, 2011)

Plastic to Oil


  • The Japanese company Blest has developed one of the smallest and safest oil-to-plastic conversion machines out on the market today. It's founder and CEO, Akinori Ito is passionate about using this machine to change the way people around the world think about their plastic trash. From solving our landfill and garbage disposal issues to reducing our oil dependancy on the Middle East, his machine may one day be in every household across Japan. While holding up a bag of trash, he states, "It's a waste to throw away, isn't it? This is a treasure." (YouTube; April 13, 2009)

Products

Though the company still mainly produces larger, industrial-use machines, Blest Co. will be more than happy to hear from you.

Here are some of the products listed on their site.

Oil Equipment – Batch

Be-h
http://blest.co.jp/seihin-1.html

Product Name: Be-h (Bieichi)
Processing capacity: 0.7 ~ 1.0kg / times
Oil rate: 80% (about 3 hours once)
Mechanical Dimensions: 560 (W) × 320 (D) × 500 (H) mm
Weight: Approximately 50kg
Power: AC100V / 14A maximum
Running cost: 1KW / hour (as standard)
Features:

  • You can see the eyes of the oil we made
  • You begin the oil out from around one hour
  • How easy to use - anyone!
  • Household 100V power available?

Image:Blest_system_plastic-in_300.jpg Image:Blest_results_tank_300.jpg

- - - -

BOR-20'
http://blest.co.jp/seihin-4.html

Product Name: BOR-20 hydrocarbon oil distillation unit
Processing capacity Processing Type 20 l
Basic operating hours: Average of two hours; Cold case ※, it may take two hours or more.
Mechanical Dimensions: 1150 (W) × 770 (D) × 1860 (H) mm
Weight: About 200kg
Power: Three-phase 200V/11A
Running cost: 3.6KW / hour (as standard)
Features: Means for mixing oil produced by distillation of oil equipment • Equivalent to light oil, kerosene equivalent, equivalent to light oil, heavy oil can be divided into equal

Oil Equipment – Continuous

B240
http://blest.co.jp/seihin-3.html

Product Name: B240 (continuous)
Processing capacity: 10kg / hour
Size: 2600 (W) × 1950 (D) × 2300 (H) mm
Weight: About 2600kg
Features: • Capable of continuous operation 24 hours! • Touch screen operation - all operated • Residue (oil, raw materials can not be) is automatically discharged! • Rate of 80% or more - the oil!

- - - -

B120
http://blest.co.jp/seihin-2.html

Product Name: B120 Continuous Oil Equipment
Processing capacity: 5kg / Time
Size: 2500 (W) × 1950 (D) × 2450 (H) mm
Weight: About 2400kg
Features: Capable of continuous operation 24 hours! • Touch screen operation - all operated • Small Oil Equipment placed at each location one at a time! • Rate of 80% or more - the oil!

PS Only Oil Equipment

Be-PS16

http://blest.co.jp/seihin-8.html

Patents

list here

Profiles

Blest Company

Inventor: Akinori Ito

The Blest Machine was designed by Akinori Ito, after he began to see the places he played in as a child disappearing. He wanted to make the process of plastic recycling more accessible, so that less landfill would be required -- an increasing problem in densely-populated Japan.

Coverage

In the News


  • Waste to Energy > Plastic > Oil > Blest >
    Small Device Turns Plastic into Oil (video) - [Belated update] A group in Japan has devised the technology to convert discarded plastics back into oil. One kilogram of plastics, if burned, produces around 3 kilograms of CO2. When reprocessed by the machine, that one kilogram of plastic can yield up to one liter of oil. (PESWiki; August 21, 2012)
  • Featured: Waste to Energy > Plastic > Oil >
    Blest Machine recycles plastic back into oil - A Japanese device converts certain plastics into oil -- and it is presently commercially available in sizes ranging from a tabletop version for a home to larger continuous feed versions for small industrial use. The plastic is boiled, not burnt, and the gaseous fumes are vented into a water bubbler, which cools the gas into oil. (PESWiki; December 17, 2010)
  • Plastic Turns into Oil When “Blest” -... The Japanese company Blest has done something truly astonishing You can watch the Blest CEO, Akinori Ito, explain the machine in this video ...(Got2BeGreen; Aug 26, 2010)
  • Making Oil out of Plastic - Don't know if it would work on a large scale, but Japan's Blest Company has "developed a machine which recycles plastic waste back into oil. (TreeHugger; July 22, 2007)

Other Coverage

  • Google News > "Blest"+plastic (416,000 results as of December 2010; most of these are probably from a Google fix that changes "Blest" to "blessed"; but at least on the first page, all hits are relevant.)

Contact

http://blest.co.jp/otoiawase.html

Blest Co
Tel: (Country Code: 81) 0563-51-5604; Fax: 0463-51-5607

email: info@blest.co.jp

See also

GENERAL W2E

PREVENTION OF WASTE

TYPES OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY

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- PESWiki home page

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