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Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:T Cullen

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Bedini Motor #4
Bedini Motor #3

T. Cullen's Replications of John Bedini's "School Girl Radiant Energy Circuit and Motor"

Contents

Latest

Oct. 20, 2004 - Working on Motor #5. Motor #4 continues to run non-stop.

Overview

As of Oct 20, 2004, 5 Bedini motor replications have been built.

  • Motor #5 - Untested - Built a new wheel out of compact disks. Used a plastic spool as a center support in the middle of the wheel. Re-inforced the CD's and positioned the magnets closer to the center. The wheel is attached to 2 CD drive motors from old computer CD disk drives. Should be much more stable and durable than motor #3.
  • Motor #4 - Success - Used a 20" aluminum bicycle wheel with good bearings. Ten ceramic magnets were glued around the wheel perimeter and the wheel assembly was mounted in a wood frame. Would not work with a 9 volt battery. Wheel spins continuously with 12 volt lead acid garden tractor battery. Has successfully charged 2 dead 12 volt lead acid batteries simultaneously while spinning the wheel.
  • Motor #3 - Success, then failure - Used a CD drive motor as an axle. Wheel was made from two compact disks with 6 ceramic magnets glued around the perimeter. Power source was a 9 volt battery. Motor would run very fast. Wheel assembly would wobble due to being held by only the one CD drive motor. The next day, the voltage was doubled by adding another 9 volt battery in series (16.5 volts measured). The motor accellerated to an incredible fast RPM rate. In less then 2 minutes, the CD wheel was spinning so fast the CD's shattered. The magnets flew around the room and the CD's broke into many peices.
  • Motor #2b - Somewhat Successful - - Used the same training wheel as Motor #2. Cut the rubber off the training wheel and attached 5 ceramic magnets to the plastic part of the training wheel. Used a rebuilt simplified circuit. The wheel would not self-rotate, probably due to too much friction. Wheel axle was a bolt through a hole in the plastic without bearings. Same circuit and coil made Susan Carter's wheel rotate without stopping.
  • Motor #2a - Failed - Made with a childs training wheel mounted on a 2x4 board. Tried using 12 Neodynium magnets imbedded in the rubber of the wheel. Wheel was plastic without bearings. Power source was a 9 volt battery. It would not self-rotate or light the bulb.
  • Motor #1 - Failed - Used a metal 20" bicycle wheel held up with the front forks from the bike. A vice was use to hold the fork and wheel over the coil. 12 ceramic magnets were used on the wheel. Input power was 9 volt battery. It would not self-rotate or light the neon bulb. Probably due to the wheel being steel instead of non-magnetic.

Notes on the Motors

Motor #4 Notes

Oct. 20, 2004 - Motor #4 is built from a 20" aluminum bicycle wheel found at the local landfill. It is mounted on a wood frame. The wheel has good bearings and spins freely for almost 2 minutes without hooking it to the Bedini circuit. It has 10 ceramic magnets glued to the wheel.

Cullen's Bedini Motor #4
I tried several times without success to get the wheel to self-rotate using a 9 volt battery. It would spin for over 3 minutes and the bulb would flash rapidly, but it would not continue rotating.

I hooked up a 12 volt battery and it worked. The battery is a new lead-acid garden tractor battery. The wheel would continuously rotate without slowing down or stopping. I estimate the speed to be about 140-180 rpm.

The coil and circuit are the same as from motors #2 and #3.

On Oct. 19, I hooked two dead lead-acid car batteries to the circuit, in parallel. For the following test, battery #1 is the new lead-acid battery hooked to the circuit input, battery #2 and battery #3 are the old dead car batteries. The leads of both old batteries were attached to diode 2 and the positive post of the new input battery.

At start of testAfter 6 hrsAfter 10 hrsAfter 24 hrs
Battery #1 12.6 volts 11.5 volts 11.2 volts 12.5 volts
Battery #2 5.6 volts 8.3 volts 10.5 volts 10.6 volts
Battery #3 3.8 volts 8.2 volts 10.5 volts 10.6 volts

The wheel ran the entire 24 hours without noticably changing speed. After 24 hours, the dead batteries were charged and the input battery was almost back to what it started with. The amperage was not measured. The batteries were not analyzed with anything other than a volt meter.

It appears that the Bedini circuit ran the motor and charged two dead batteries simultaneously without running down it's input battery.

- - - -

See

Motor #3 Notes

Oct. 14, 2004 - Hooked up two 9 volt batteries in series to power the device. The CD wheel accellerated to such a high speed you could not see the magnets. In less then 2 minutes, the CDs shattered and blew apart. The magnets flew around the room. The circuit and coil were used to make Motor #4.

Video of Motor #3

Motor #3 made from compact disks
Oct. 13, 2004 - Achieved continuous rotation using a CD-ROM drive motor as an axle and two CDs as the wheel. Six magnets were glued between the two CDs, around the perimeter. The CD motor was used because it has good high-speed bearings. I wanted to see if the spining CDs would produce a voltage from the CD motor. On the first run, the magnets were not glued in strong enough and came loose. It tore off the foil when it was affixed to the foil side, it was spinning so fast. After reattaching the magnets with stronger glue, it worked fine. Occasionally it would run for about about a minute or two then die down. Because it only had one axle (the CD drive motor), it would occassionally wobble. Another CD drive motor holding the other side would have made it more stable.

At times, this motor would spin nearly as fast as a compact disk in a CD player.

Material:

  • Wheel - Two compact disks with magnets glued between them.Source: no longer need CDs Price: " $0.00
  • Axle - A motor from a CD drive. Source: used computer CD-Rom drive Price: " $0.00
  • Magnets - (first attempt) 12 Neodynimum magnets Source: Forcefield.com Price: " $0.10 each (second attempt) 3-5 ceramic magnets (2" x 3/4" x 3/8") Source: Radio Shack Price: " $1.25 each
  • Mounting - CD drive motor glued to wood frame Source: scrap wood Price: " $0.00
  • Input Power - 9 volt battery Source: found Price: " $0.00
  • Circuit and Coil - same as Motor #2


Motor #2 Notes

The Neodynium magnets did not work.  Peter Lindemann said that the magnets for this set-up need to be Ceramics, preferably Ceramic 5.
The Neodynium magnets did not work. Peter Lindemann said that the magnets for this set-up need to be Ceramics, preferably Ceramic 5.
This motor was made from a 4" training wheel. The first attempt was to use Neodynium magnets. I drilled holes into the rubber around the perimeter of the wheel and pressed the neos snuggly into the holes so the surface was flush with the edge of the wheel. I rebuilt the circuit using my simplified schematic. I used the recommened resistor and diode (Radio Shack did not have the exact ones when I purchased the parts for motor #1).

The wheel would not continue to spin with the Neodynium magnets. I cut the rubber tire off the wheel and attached 3 ceramic magnets with rubber bands to the plastic wheel. The wheel would still not turn by itself, but the bulb would light up.

Next, I removed the training wheel and held the coil and circuit to Susan Carter's recently built wheel. My circuit and coil made her wheel spin with a 9 volt battery.

The training wheel would not continuously spin, probably due to friction. The wheel did not have any bearings. The axle was a bolt through the center of the plastic wheel.

The circuit worked, the wheel did not.

Material:

  • Wheel - 4" plastic training wheel from a childs bike Source: donated Price: " $0.00
  • Magnets - (first attempt) 12 Neodynimum magnets Source: Forcefield.com Price: " $0.10 each (second attempt) 3-5 ceramic magnets (2" x 3/4" x 3/8") Source: Radio Shack Price: " $1.25 each
  • Mounting - steel training wheel holder mounted in wood Source: donated Price: " $0.00
  • Input Power - 9 volt battery Source: found Price: " $0.00
  • Coil - about 420 wraps of #20 and #23 magnet wire on 3" spool Source: wire from Sterling Allan Price: " ?
  • Transistor - 2N3055 Source: Radio Shack part no. 276-2041 Price: " $2.29
  • Resistor - 680 Ohm Source: Sterling Allan Price: " ?
  • Diode 1 - 1N4001 1Amp at 50 volts Source: Radio Shack part no. 276-1101 Price: " $0.59 for 2, $0.30 each
  • Diode 2 - 1N4007 Source: Sterling Allan Price: " ?
  • Bulb - neon bulb Source: Sterling Allan Price: " ?
  • Wire - 16-20 guage Source: found Price: " $0.00


Motor #1 Notes

This motor did not work. This was attempt to quickly demonstrate the Bedini SG motor. I found a child's used bike and took the wheel and front forks off. I clamped the forks into a vice, then placed ceramic magnets around the wheel. The magnets were held to the wheel by their own magnetic attraction. The wheel assembly was held over the coil by the vice. I could not get the wheel to continuously rotate.

Material:

  • Wheel - 20" steel bicycle wheel Source: donated Price: " $0.00
  • Magnets - tried 6, 10, 12, and 18 ceramic magnets (2" x 3/4" x 3/8") Source: Radio Shack Price: " $1.25 each
  • Mounting - vice mounted on piece of wood Source: had vice, found piece of wood Price: " $0.00
  • Input Power - 9 volt battery Source: found Price: " $0.00
  • Coil - 100ft of #24 magnet wire, 100ft. of #22 magnet wire Source: Radio Shack Price: " $3.90
  • Transistor - 2N3055 Source: Radio Shack part no. 276-2041 Price: " $2.29
  • Resistor - 470 Ohm Source: Radio Shack part no. 271-1115 Price: " $0.99 for 5, $0.20 each
  • Diode 1 - 1N4001 1Amp at 50 volts Source: Radio Shack part no. 276-1101 Price: " $0.59 for 2, $0.30 each
  • Diode 2 - 2.5Amp at 1000 volts Source: Radio Shack part no. 276-1114 Price: " $1.69 for 3, $0.57 each
  • Wire - 16-20 guage Source: found Price: " $0.00



Simplified Bedini Circuit

Image:Cullen_Simplified_Bedini_SG_Circuit_400.jpg
The simplified Bedini SG circuit layout by T. Cullen of PES Network Inc.

Lays out the diodes, resistor, and neon bulb in a line for easy access and soldering.

Image:Tom_s_Bedini_components_401.jpg

Bare Bones of T. Cullen's Bedini SG circuit system.

See also


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