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Directory:Turbine Truck Engines, Inc.

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Image:DetonationCycleGasTurbineengine 250.jpg

Turbine Truck Engines, Inc. (TTEG.OB) is the owner of an exclusive license for the manufacturing and marketing of a highly innovative, environmentally-friendly 300 to 1,000 horsepower turbine-based truck engine.

"Known as the Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine engine (DCGT), its patented cyclical detonation technology is poised to revolutionize the heavy-duty truck engine market."

About

Official Website

http://www.ttengines.com

Awards

Interview

Image:FreeEnergyNowRadioIcon95x95 byKevn.gif

Stream | Download (13 Mb mp3) - On July 27, 2009, Congress:Founder:Sterling D. Allan conducted a 1-hour live interview with Mike Rouse, CEO, and Sandy Gregory of Turbine Truck Engines, LLC as part of the Free Energy Now radio show.

Image:Turbine-Truck-Engines 5th-generation-prototype 95x95.jpg
Latest: Directory:Engines > Directory:Turbine Truck Engines, Inc. > Turbine Truck Engines poised to revolutionize the engine market (Interview) - The patented and tested Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine engine now in its 5th-generation is poised to revolutionize the heavy-duty truck engine market, costing about the same or perhaps less than other engines, while consuming around 30% less fuel and having much cleaner emissions. (PESN August 4, 2009) (Comment)

How it Works

Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine engine

Technology

"The DCGT is powered by an innovative new electromagnetic isothermal combustion process that produces complete combustion of fuel-oxidized mixtures in cyclic detonations.

The high-pressure gasses produced by these detonations drive a unique turbine producing shaft horsepower. The engine’s unique combustion process allows the DCGT to operate with blower air at low static pressure, negating the necessity of compressing and preheating fuel-oxidizer mixtures prior to combustion. Once the compression of fuel-oxidizer mixtures has been eliminated, the engine both achieves higher thermal efficiency in a simplified mechanical structure, and provides significant advantages over current diesel, gasoline, and gas turbine engines.

Image:Ttengineschematic 250.jpg

A Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine engine includes a turbine rotor contained within a housing. Exhaust ports of respective valveless combustion chambers located on opposite sides of the rotor direct combustion gasses towards the turbine, which operates in similar fashion to a Pelton Water Wheel.

Turbine blades are positively displaced through a blade race (tangentially to the turbine shaft) by kinetic impact and expansion of gasses exiting from the combustion chambers via nozzles, rather than pistons, axial flow, or radial inflo expanders.

The combustion chambers are connected by a valveless manifold fed with fuel and oxidizer. When combustible gasses are detonated by an igniter (via the EIC Process) in one of the combustion chambers, the back pressure from the detonation shuts off the fuel and oxidizer flow to that chamber and redirects the fuel and oxidizer to the opposite chamber, where detonation occurs. The process repeats cyclically. Power is taken off the rotor shaft mechanically or electrically.

The EIC Process

Image:Ttengineblockdiagram 250.jpg

The block diagram shows the nature of the turbine assembly, electrical system, and fuel supply in the Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine engine system.

A conventional rotary blower supplies low pressure air to the manifold. (Using a blower rather than a compressor provides many benefits, including less exhaust gas per horsepower hour and higher thermo mechanical efficiencies than gas turbine or piston engines) Low pressure Gaseous Fuel from a throttle regulator is injected into the venturis in the manifold, which is adjacent to the constant volume combustion chamber. In the combustion chamber, a high power electric arc (300 Joules) produces photolytic and radiolytic particles and waves, which disassociates oxygen and hydrocarbon molecules throughout the chamber, producing complete detonation and high velocity shock waves that kinetically compress the remaining inert gases. Detonation pressures exceed 80 atmospheres and produce mean chamber pressures of 20 atmospheres to drive the turbine.

The DCGT Engine with Hybrid-Electric Drive

Image:TtengineDCGTshem 250.jpg

Schematic Drawing and Explanation

Turbine Truck Engines’ revolutionary new Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine engine can further reduce environmental pollution and increase overall engine fuel efficiency when used as the heart of a hybrid-electric power plant. As shown in the above diagram, the vehicle may be powered by either the DCGT engine or the battery. The battery is charged whenever the DCGT is turning and, additionally, during breaking, via the D.C. Motor. The D.C. Motor will also add braking horsepower to the wheels during deceleration, by running backwards, reducing brake wear. The entire in-line direct drive hybrid-electric DCGT engine requires no clutches.

How does the DCGT work?

Image:TtengineDGCGTline1 250.jpg

The Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine (DCGT) engine is unique in its operation cycle simple yet robust and reliable at the same time. A cross-section of the engine shows its internal components. At the heart of the engine is the turbine wheel which consists of a series of blades installed on a disk attached to the main drive shaft. Two combustion chambers (CC), that are staggered, direct the high-energy detonation gases onto the turbine blades. Thermodynamic expansion of the hot gas causes the turbine to spin, and low energy gas is discharged from the turbine assembly via the exhaust outlets (EO).

As can be seen from the sketch, the air/fuel supply pipes to the CC are of different lengths. This is crucial to the successful operation of the DCGT. As fuel/air is supplied to both Combustion Chambers (CC-1 and CC-2), the path to CC-1 which is shown by the blue arrow is shorter than that to CC-2 (green arrow). Detonation occurs in CC-1 first.

Image:TtengeinDCGTline2 250.jpg

When detonation occurs (as shown), two events take place. The first event is to introduce high-energy gases to the turbine wheel assembly. This will cause the drive shaft to spin delivering useful work. The second event which is equally important is to create a pressure-based blockage in the supply pipe, as shown. This pressure-based blockage allows the next “dose??? of fuel/air to be delivered to CC-2. Detonation next occurs in CC-2. As a result, more high-energy gas is introduced to the turbine wheel with additional net gain of useful work. Pressure-based blockage then builds up in the supply pipe to CC-2 diverting fuel/air to CC-1, and the cycle continues.

Image:TtengeineDCGTline3 250.jpg

This cyclic detonation has several benefits. First, the discontinuous use of fuel leads to significant fuel savings and increased efficiency. Second, the intermittent introduction of high-temperature events (detonation) leads to an overall reduction in equilibrium temperature, and thus, longer part life and longer maintenance intervals.

Videos/Photos

Prototypes

Image:Ttengine540hpturbine- 250.jpg

Turbine Truck High Quality Video

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2.42 Minutes Turbine Truck Engines Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine Engine

(''YouTube April 28, 2008)

Costs

Approximately $25,000.

Advantages

one-third less burnt fuel than current piston engine technology

30%+ less fuel emissions and greenhouse gasses

fewer nitrogen oxides (NO, NO2, N2O2) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions

operates on all fuels: hydrocarbon, hydrogen and synthetic

flex fuel and mixed fuels capability

no pistons or valves, and no lube oil, filters or pumps

fewer moving parts means less maintenance

high power-to-weight ratio

air cooled and lightweight: less than 2 lbs. per hp

cold start capability

Applications

Truck Engines

Independent Testing

Patents

Patents

A United States Patent application was made in 1997 and approved on December 14, 1999 for a “Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine Engine System Having Intermittent Fuel and Air Delivery."

On July 13, 2009, we were informed that TT Engines just received a patent on their latest tweaks on the technology, giving them full coverage.

U.S Patent No. 6,000,214 protects the new Pulse Detonation Engine and Electromagnetic Isothermal Combustion (EIC) System in its entirety.

Abstract: A detonation cycle gas turbine engine includes a turbine motor contained within a housing. Exhaust ports of respective valveless combustion chambers on opposite sides of the rotor direct combustion gases toward the turbine. The chambers are connected by a valveless manifold fed with fuel and oxidizer. When combustible gases are detonated by an igniter in one of the combustion chambers, the back pressure from the detonation shuts off the fuel and oxidizer flow to that chamber and redirects the fuel and oxidizer to the opposite chamber, where detonation occurs. The process repeats cyclically. Power is taken off the rotor shaft mechanically or electrically.

Profiles

Company: Turbine Truck Engines, Inc

History

Stock

TTEG.OB

Inventor: Robert L Scragg

SB-2 SEC Filing

Google Patents

Rex Research Solar Reactor Engine Technology

Coverage

In the News

News

Image:Turbine-Truck-Engines 5th-generation-prototype 95x95.jpg
Latest: Directory:Engines > Directory:Turbine Truck Engines, Inc. > Turbine Truck Engines poised to revolutionize the engine market (Interview) - The patented and tested Detonation Cycle Gas Turbine engine now in its 5th-generation is poised to revolutionize the heavy-duty truck engine market, costing about the same or perhaps less than other engines, while consuming around 30% less fuel and having much cleaner emissions. (PESN August 4, 2009) (Comment)

540 HP Turbine Truck Engine Prototype - Turbine Truck Engines has received the prototype of their 540 horsepower turbine designed to run on gasoline, diesel, propane, natural gas, hydrogen, methanol, ethanol or LPG or combinations of the above as a way to help trucks become more environmentally friendly. It has very few moving parts and the very complete combustion helps increase efficiency while lowering emissions. (Truck Accessory Guide April 5, 1007)

Other Coverage

Wright Reports

Turbine Truck Engines Inc. Secures 10 Million Dollar Equity Line of Credit for New Energy Efficient 'Flex-Fuel' Engine (The Auto Channel June 6, 2006)

Comments

See Talk:Directory:Turbine Truck Engines, Inc.

Contact

Turbine Truck Engines, Inc.

917 Biscayne Blvd. Suite 6

DeLand, Florida 32724 USA

David Laidlaw

Voice: (386) 943-8358

Fax: (386) 943-6232

E-Mail: [mailto:DLaidlaw@ttengines.com?subject=Turbine_Truck_Engines,_Inc._featured_at_PESWiki.com DLaidlaw@ttengines.com]

See also

Directory:Turbines

Directory:Engines

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