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Directory:Rotoverter:Replications:Norman Wootan

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<pesn type=
Replication (overunity achieved)"></pesn>

:"PMI DC perm magnet generator and the RV as a prime mover"

Here is a summary of Norms results quoted from his internet disclosure on Mon, 25 Feb 2002 – on the Keelynet forum.

Quote:

:I loaded the DC generator with 160-watt incandescent lamp load. Since I have two independent systems here, one being driven with 120VAC line input and the other system a belt driven DC generator being loaded with pure resistive load. Here are the numbers: Motor was retuned for minimum current draw which required 45 mfd, 370V oil filled cap with a resulting current draw of .15 amps @ 120VAC input.

:The independent generator put out .75 amps @ 74 VDC into a resistive load. The only thing that needs to be looked at on the input side of the equation is the power factor of the AC input. I need to look at the current/voltage phase relationship. I'm satisfied with the figures that I calculate which shows roughly

18 watts AC input

with a DC output of 55.5 watts.

:What I find most interesting is the fact that the more load you put on the 3-phase motor the lower the input current draw and the motor gets colder. The belt driven DC generator gets quite hot after about 30 minutes of running time. Go figure it out. I believe there is a lot to be learned about revolving magnetic fields in 3 phase motors and tuning the output via capacitors. This experiment is so easy to do everyone should seriously look at this phenomenon.

-End quote

post from keelynet:

:Norman also has done without-a-doubt overunity tests of Hector Torres' AC motor conversion the "rotovertor" where you take a 5000W AC 3ph AC motor, and make it run on 20 or so watts at idle (I have done it too - its easy) and Norman spun a DC servo motor with the "RV" (DC motor is PMI brand - low lenz design) and got it to put out way more WATTS than being inputted to it

Further Norman Wootan quotes from various mailinglists

[http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/jlnlabs/message/20317]

Date: Mon, 25 Feb 2002 21:02:17 -0600

There is one very important point that must be stated here about Hectors rotoverter motor. This phenomenon will only appear when you run a 3phase motor wired for 480V on 120V single phase. One hot leg and one earth reference neutral leg hooked to L1 and L2 with a run cap hooked between L1 (hot leg) and L3 to provide phase shift. This arrangement is called a "floating delta" by "old timer" electricians.

If you try running the 3 phase motor with two hot legs (208/230V) it won't work. You must have one leg at circuit neutral reference. Norm

[http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/jlnlabs/message/20296]

Mon Feb 25, 2002 1:10 am

Well said Hector:: Here is the verification that you have been waiting for. Per our off line dialog here is the set up for my rotaryverter so others may duplicate what we have seen.

Motor is 3HP, 3 Phase, 60HZ, 1725 RPM, wired for operation on 480V.

Motor free running, tuned to minimum current draw from 120V line input required 20mfd 370V oil filled cap resulting with a current draw of .66 amps @ 120VAC input.

Motor loaded with belt drive stepup 6:1 ratio to drive a PMI disk PM, DC motor acting as a generator. (generator unloaded) required 30 mfd, 370V oil filled cap with a resulting current draw of .50 amps @ 120VAC input.

Now I loaded the DC generator with 160 watt incandescent lamp load.

Now things get more interesting. Since I have two independent systems here, one being driven with 120VAC line input and the other system a belt driven DC generator being loaded with pure resistive load. Well here are the numbers: Motor was retuned for minimum current draw which required 45 mfd, 370V oil filled cap with a resulting current draw of .15 amps @ 120VAC input. The independent

generator put out .75 amps @ 74 VDC into a resistive load.

The only thing that needs to be looked at on the input side of the equation is the power factor of the AC input. I need to find my tectronics current probe for my scope to look at the current/ voltage phase relationship. I'm satisfied with the figures that I calculate which shows roughly 18 watts AC input with a DC output of 55.5 watts. What I find most interesting is the fact that the more load you put on the 3 phase motor the lower the input current draw and the motor gets colder. The belt driven DC generator gets quite hot after about 30 minutes of running time. Go figure it out.

I believe there is a lot to be learned about revolving magnetic fields in 3 phase motors and tunning the output via capacitors. This experiment is so easy to do everyone should seriously look at this phenomenon. My next step is to document PF on input and improve the DC side of the circuit to provide more loading.

By the way, all measurements were made with four each Fluke 87E meters which I believe to be fairly reliable on 60HZ and DC measurements. Nothing exotic here. Only PF to be determined.

Norm

[http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/jlnlabs/message/20369] Thu Feb 28, 2002 2:51 am

What was the make and model # of your 3 phase motor? Any photo's? How did you tune to determine the capacitors needed? Looking forward to the results of your PF measurements.

The motor is a General Electric, Mod. 5K49ZG1759, 3 HP, 3 phase, 230/460 V, 1725 RPM, 9.2/4.6 amp, SF 1.0, 56 frame.

An 80 mfd cap is used to start the motor (aprox. 2 sec.). Tuning is via changing the value of the run capacitor. Attach neutral line to L1, attach line hot (120V.) to L2 and attach your run cap between L2 and L3. For starting, momentairly parallel the run cap with the 40mfd start cap. Any 3 phase motor will work if it has the high voltage winding(460/480V). Norm

[http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/jlnlabs/message/20485] Mon Mar 4, 2002 4:20 pm

Hi! Uli: When you are working with a resonant circuit you have X-L component and an X-C component. Tuning means that we are changing the value of the capacitance (X-C) to cancel reactance (X-L) so that the motor windings represent a pure resistive load. You have to tune a resonant circuit by changing the value of either reactance or capacitance. Norm

Norman Wootan archive on evgray from keelynet

compiled by konehead

see also

Directory:Rotoverter

Directory:Rotoverter:Replications

There was an error working with the wiki: Code[1]

Category:Resonance

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