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Directory:Phinergy Metal-Air-Water Battery

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Compiled by Congress:Founder:Sterling D. Allan

Pure Energy Systems News

April 4, 2013

A Israeli company called Phinergy has come up with a metal-air-water battery technology that could enable a vehicle to travel 1000 miles on one charge, with a couple of stops to refill the system with water. There may even be some HHO magic mixed in there.

Official Websites

http://www.phinergy.com

http://www.youtube.com/user/PhinergyTV

Videos

Phinergy drives car by metal, air, and water

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"Phinergy develops zero emission, high energy density systems based on Metal Air energy technologies which significantly increase the driving range of current Electric Vehicles. Other applications include: stationary energy storage, consumer electronics, transportation, aerospace & defense." (YouTube Mar 13, 2013)

In the News

Google News > Phinergy

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Latest: Directory:Storage > Directory:Batteries > NEW: Directory:Phinergy Metal-Air-Water Battery > Phinergy's metal-air battery yields 1000-mile EV range - A Israeli company called Phinergy has come up with a metal-air-water battery technology that could enable a vehicle to travel 1000 miles on one charge, with a couple of stops to refill the system with water. There may even be some HHO magic mixed in there. (News:Pure Energy Blog April 4, 2013)

Phinergy's metal-air battery could eliminate EV range anxiety - Israel-based company Phinergy claims to have developed metal-air battery technology that promises to end the range anxiety associated with electric vehicles. The company’s battery currently consists of 50 aluminum plates, each providing energy for around 20 miles (32 km) of driving. This adds up to a total potential range of 1,000 miles (1,609 km), with stops required only every couple of hundred miles to refill the system with water. (GizMag April 3, 2013)

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