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Directory:Changing World Technology - Thermal Depolymerization Process

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Image:ThermalDepolymerizationbyCPT300x300 byKevn.jpg

Changing World Technologies (CWT)'s Thermal Conversion Process purportedly reforms organic waste into renewable fuel oil, without combustion, incineration or toxic residue, providing a solution for solid waste management while creating a renewable domestic source of energy.

However, one agency that visited the facility recently (~May-June 2008) called the output "black slurry". An installation the company built to convert turkey plant waste to fuel was shut down by the governor as a public nusiance due to the smell.

According to the company website, the Thermal Conversion Process, or TCP, breaks down waste into its smallest chemical units and reforms them into new combinations to produce alternative fuels and specialty chemicals. The process emulates the earth’s natural geothermal activity, whereby organic material is converted into fossil fuel under conditions of extreme heat and pressure over millions of years. Even heavy metals are transformed into harmless oxides. TCP uses pipes and controls temperature and pressure to reduce the bio-remediation process from millions of years to mere hours.

Official Website

http://www.changingworldtech.com/

FAQs

How it Works

Image:Thermal Conversion Process 400.gif

CWT's Thermal Conversion Process reforms organic waste into renewable fuel oil, without combustion, incineration or toxic residue. TCP breaks down waste into its smallest chemical units and reforms them into new combinations to produce alternative fuels and specialty chemicals. The process emulates the earth’s natural geothermal activity, whereby organic material is converted into fossil fuel under conditions of extreme heat and pressure over millions of years. TCP uses pipes and controls temperature and pressure to reduce the bio-remediation process from millions of years to mere hours. TCP is more than 80% energy efficient.

By utilizing above-ground waste streams, energy produced by TCP does not add new carbon to the atmosphere, and therefore contributes to the arrest of global warming. In addition, it provides a solution for solid waste management while creating a renewable domestic source of energy without toxic emissions.

The Thermal Conversion Process, or TCP, mimics the earth’s natural geothermal process by using water, heat and pressure to transform organic and inorganic wastes into oils, gases, carbons, metals and ash. Even heavy metals are transformed into harmless oxides.

Videos/Photos

CWf9nYbm3ac

(6.34 Minutes)

Free Energy 400 Billion Dollar Secret - Alternative oil solution that is available now. It cost the United States 400 billion dollars to import oil "last year", seems a well rounded number given the barrels of oil imported and the 2007 price of oil. It has consistently, for many years, been the stated goal of the United States to reduce or eliminate its dependence on foreign oil, therefore, if any alternative energy source seems capable of achieving that goal, it should be pursued with the utmost vigor. We have here in the United States the only method known to man which can take any non-nuclear material containing carbon,and using this process, deliver a diesel quality fuel oil in two short hours! Despite the promise inherent in this system to not only alleviate our dependence on foreign oil, but to do so while contributing to a major degree in cleaning the environment. (YouTube April 8, 2008)

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Costs

Disclaimer

According to the video, the pilot plant cost $20 million USD.

Advantages

Reduces the spread of dioxins.

Produces renewable diesel.

Agriculture represents over 50% of the estimated 12 billion tons of solid waste produced each year in the U.S. The food processing industry in the U.S. alone generates billions of pounds of organically rich wastes each year. These wastes are associated with the processing of both animal and plant products. If all agricultural waste were made available for use in the TCP, an extraordinarily large amount of oil could be generated that almost meets the 4 billion barrels of oil that are imported to the U.S. each year.

Energy Potential of Agricultural Market U.S.

All Agricultural Waste - 6 billion tons 10% solids

600 million tons per year

× 2,000 lbs.

1,200,000,000,000 total lbs.

÷ 7.7 lbs. in gallon

155,844,155,844 total

÷ 42 gallons in barrel

3,710,575,139 total barrel of oil/equivalent

Applications

Waste reduction

Oil production

Independent Testing

list here

Patents

U.S. Patent 6846343 - Fertilizer manufactured from animal wastes and method of producing same January 25, 2005

Abstract: Integrated waste treatment and fertilizer and feed supplement production methods to be implemented at organic waste source sites, at remote treatment sites, or partially at the organic waste source site and at a remote location, whether in small or large scale operations. The methods are suitable for retrofitting existing organic waste sources and for treating the organic waste generated by a single source or by a plurality of sources. These methods provide: reduction or elimination of emissions of acrid and greenhouse gases effluents that meet discharge standards and that can be used in wetland and irrigation projects organic based, granular, slow release NPK fertilizer of standard composition and size that can be supplemented with micronutrients and soil amendment materials and whose composition can be adjusted to meet demands and needs of specific markets methane-rich biogas recovery for its subsequent use for heating, for power generation or for catalytic and synthetic processes, and feed supplement including feed supplement for cattle. The methods comprise steps for thoroughly separating suspended and dissolved materials, preventing gas emissions and capturing gases, and minimizing waste disposal. Fertilizer base may be produced by mixing waste with at least one of a phosphate precipitating agent, a base, a flocculant, and optionally with an ammonia retaining agent and a densifier, subsequently separating and drying the precipitate. Pathogen-free, odor-free and dust-free fertilizer may be obtained by temperature controlled incineration or combustion.

Profiles

Company: Changing World Technologies
Image:Renewable Environmental Solutions Carthage, Missouri bios diesel Plant 95x95.gif

Changing World Technologies (CWT), founded in August 1997, is committed to addressing the problems in the energy and environmental arenas. Bringing together the best technical and scientific expertise, their purpose is to identify emerging technologies and effect the commercialization of these programs to allow energy efficiency without further destroying our delicate planet.

Yahoo Finance Bio

Chairman and CEO: Brian S. Appel

See Interview - (FoxNews July 23, 2003)

CWT’s subsidiaries and affiliate companies include:

Resource Recovery Corporation, Inc. (RRC) was incorporated in May 1996 for the purpose of developing and marketing an emerging technology known as the Thermal Depolymerization Process (TDP).

Thermo-Depolymerization Process, LLC (TDP, LLC) was formed in June 1998 for the purpose of developing a demonstration facility for the TDP technology. Process refinements were accomplished over the next five years as the TDP evolved into a more directed Thermal Conversion Process (TCP).

Renewable Environmental Solutions, LLC (RES) was formed in 2000 to develop the processing of agricultural waste and low-value streams throughout the world. RES, wholly owned by CWT, has the United States’ first operational bio-refinery situated in Carthage, Missouri, producing an indigenous supply of Renewable Diesel from agricultural and livestock wastes.

Note: "Reports in 2004 claimed that the facility was selling products at 10% below the price of equivalent oil, but its production costs were low enough that the plant produced a profit. At the time it was paying for turkey waste.

The plant then consumed 270 tons of turkey offal (the full output of the turkey processing plant) and 20 tons of egg production waste daily. According to a 2/1/2005 article by Fortune Magazine, the Carthage plant was producing about 400 barrels per day (64 m³/d) of crude oil. This oil is being refined as No. 2 (a standard grade oil which is used for diesel and residential heating oil) and No. 4 (a lower grade oil used in industrial heating).

In April 2005 the plant was reported to be running at a loss. Further 2005 reports summarized some economic setbacks which the Carthage plant encountered since its planning stages. It was thought that concern over mad cow disease would prevent the use of turkey waste and other animal products as cattle feed, and thus this waste would be free. As it turned out, turkey waste may still be used as feed in the United States, so that the facility must purchase that feed stock at a cost of $30 to $40 per ton, adding $15 to $20 per barrel to the cost of the oil. Final cost, as of January 2005, was $80/barrel ($1.90/gal).

The above cost of production also excludes the operating cost of the thermal oxidizer and scrubber added in May 2005 in response to odor complaints.

A biofuel tax credit of roughly $1 per US gallon (26 ¢/L) on production costs was not available because the oil produced did not meet the definition of "biodiesel" according to the relevant American tax legislation. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 specifically added thermal depolymerization to a $1 renewable diesel credit, which became effective at the end of 2005.

As reported on 04/02/2006 by Discover Magazine, the Carthage plant was producing 500 barrels per day (79 m³/d) of oil made from 270 tons of turkey guts and 20 tons of pig fat. A federal subsidy (the Energy Policy Act of 2005) allowed a profit of $4/barrel of output oil." (There was an error working with the wiki: Code[1]

The current business plan is to construct plants jointly with partners who have waste streams under their control. As they develop their business, they anticipate that in the future TCP facilities will have many corporate structures.

Stock Symbol

Changing World Technologies, Inc. Files Registration Statement for Proposed Initial Public Offering - (MarketWatch Aug. 12, 2008)

Hoovers

Inventor: Larry P. Sower

Recent Patents

Coverage

In the News

Press Room

TDP: The Next Big Thing - In May of 2003, Discover Magazine published Anything Into Oil. It was a look at a technology called thermal depolymerization (TDP), which could take any organic material and turn it into oil. This was a high profile write-up with a lot of hype, and the technology of Brian Appel and his company Changing World Technologies (CWT) was really going to change the world. (The Oil Drum April 11, 2007)

Interview - Chairman and CEO: Brian S. Appel (FoxNews July 23, 2003)

Anything Into Oil - Technological savvy could turn 600 million tons of turkey guts and other waste into 4 billion barrels of light Texas crude each year. (Discover Magazine May 1, 2003)

Related Resources

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Related Technologies

Image:Green Power Inc diesel product 95x95.jpg

Congress:Top 100 Technologies -- RD >Directory:Green Power Inc's NanoDiesel:Catalytic Pressureless Depolymerization (Oiling) - Green Power Inc has developed a catalytic pressureless depolymerization (CPD) process they call "NanoDiesel" that inexpensively converts biomass and municipal waste into high quality diesel fuel, which could solve the world's energy and waste problems at the same time, without upsetting the CO2 balance.

Comments

See Talk:Directory:Changing World Technology - Thermal Depolymerization Process

Contact

Contact Form

Changing World Technologies, Inc.

60 Hempstead Ave.

Hempstead, NY 11552

Phone: 516-486-0100

Fax: 516-486-0460

See also

Directory:Diesel

GENERAL W2E

Directory:Waste to Energy

News:Waste to Energy

Directory:Thermal Electric - e.g. waste heat

PREVENTION OF WASTE

Directory:Energy Efficiency

Directory:Conservation

Directory:Recycling

Directory:Home Generation:Gray Water Recycling

Directory:Nuclear Remediation

TYPES OF WASTE-TO-ENERGY

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Directory:Energy from Sewage

Directory:Urine Power

Directory:Plastic and Energy

Directory:Plant-Based Plastic

Directory:Biomass

Directory:Biodiesel from Algae Oil

Directory:Microorganisms in Energy Production

Directory:Microbial Fuel Cells

Directory:Non-Fossil Oil

Directory:Refinery Flaring Recovery

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OIL FOOTER

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PowerPedia:Fossil fuel

Directory:Diesel

Directory:Lubricants

OIL POLLUTION

Directory:Ecological Impact of Oil

Directory:BP's Gulf Oil Volcano

Directory:Fracking

Directory:Ocean Trash Vortexes (Gyres)

OIL REMEDIES

Directory:Fuel Efficiency - many more links here

Directory:Microwave-based Oil Extraction

Directory:GeoBioreactors

Directory:Clean Coal

Directory:Recycling

FOSSIL-BASED OIL REPLACEMENTS

Directory:Non-Fossil Oil

Directory:Abiotic Oil

Directory:Alternative Fuels - many more oil-replacement links here, including fuel treatment solutions

Directory:Water as Fuel

Directory:Algae for Oil

Directory:Biodiesel

Directory:Biodiesel from Algae Oil

Directory:Biomass

Directory:Ethanol

SPECIFIC COMPANIES

Directory:West Fabrication Institute's Taylor/Pyrox Technology

Directory:Green Power Inc's NanoDiesel:Catalytic Pressureless Depolymerization (Oiling)

Directory:Global Resource Corp:High-Frequency Attenuating Wave Kinetics or HAWK

Directory:Changing World Technology - Thermal Depolymerization Process

OIL 'SCARCITY'

Site:LRP:The Energy Non-Crisis

Directory:Peak Oil

Directory:North American Oil Fields

OTHER RESOURCES

Directory:Plastic and Energy

Directory:Fuelwatch Worldwide

Directory:Energy Business Reports

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- Directory

Latest

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Directory:J

Directory:S

Directory:Tree

News

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