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Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:Sterling Allan:Data:Exp14.2 Steady State Discharging

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You are here: PES Network > Main Page > There was an error working with the wiki: Code[1] > Directory:Bedini SG:Replications > Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES > Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:Sterling Allan > Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:Sterling Allan:Data > Experiment 14.2

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Exp. 14.2 Comparing Steady State Discharge with Average Voltage Drop During Continuous Rotation of Conditioned Batteries

Image:SDA Bedini SG Exp14 Exp13 Average Voltages thumb.gif

'Experiment 14.2 from Sterling D. Allan's Replication of John Bedini's Directory:Bedini SG'

Follow-up from Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:Sterling Allan:Data:Exp13 Continuous Rotation of Conditioned Batteries

Experiment 14.2 Summary : Comparing (1) the average voltage over time of the batteries from Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:Sterling Allan:Data:Exp13 Continuous Rotation of Conditioned Batteries in which conditioned batteries were rotated through the front end, taking turns from the back end (experiment duration: Nov. 22 through Nov. 28), with (2) the average voltage over time of the same batteries under the same preparatory conditions, except not in the circuit, but measuring the discharge sitting in steady state. In other words, Experiment 14.2 is a control experiment for Experiment 13.1. The comparison shows that there there was an initial voltage high at the beginning in experiment 13.1, which then gradually drops at a rate faster than the steady state discharge. Though not definitive in itself, the comparison also shows that the system maintenance of voltage level likely is in excess of what would be expected for batteries alone, implying the infusion of external energy (e.g. radiant energy in the tradition of Tesla) in order to maintain the rotation of the wheel.

Data

Raw

Exp. 14.2 Data (xls) - reporting the battery voltages during steady-state discharge under no load or charge, over the same duration of time as Exp. 13.1, which data is also shown on the chart. Exp. 14.2 Data begins on line 121. The graph display begins down at line 1026.

Image:SDA Bedini SG Exp14 bf4 b.gif

Graphs

Average Voltages Compared
Image:SDA Bedini SG Exp14 Exp13 Average Voltages.gif

Average voltage over time, measured from the same set of batteries, under two different conditions:

#Exp. 13.1 -- Taking turns rotating through Bedini SG (front to back bank, then to front, in turn) from Nov. 22-28

#Exp. 14.2 -- Discharging while just sitting in steady state with no load or charge, after having each been supercharged following Exp. 13. This steady state discharge lasted from Dec. 3-10.

Observations

There are essentially four curve shapes on the graph.

Day 1 : The average voltage begins high as Experiment 13.1 commences. That seems to be a function of this Bedini-SG-supercharged system, also seen just prior to Exp. 14.2. In exp 14.1, just prior to Exp 14.2, the batteries were hit with the battery capacity analyzer's calibrated load test, and the average voltage of the tested set went up after being hit with that load and then equilibrating.

Day 2-4 : During this interval, there is a gradual decline in average voltage labeled "A-B" in the slope graph below. Day 1 through 4 were under the same wheel rotation conditions, with the resistance set to 1963 ohms, spinning at around 73 rpm (times 16 magnets on the wheel = 1,170 magnets per minute).

Day 5 : I modified the resistance to a lower resistance for faster wheel rotation, inasmuch as John and Peter said that one wants to target a high rotation speed with optimal input-output current ratios. That is a bit of a paradox inasmuch as the general trend is for greater input-output current rations at higher resistances which produce lower wheel rotation speed, yet along that curve are a series of windows of optimization so that in a given region there exist optimal ratios relative to that region. The curve from low to high looks like a saw blade on a gradual decline, up, down, up down, but with the general trend being upward in input-output current efficiency and downward in rotation speed. In this case, we can conclude that the higher rotation speed did not produce better results by way of maintaining the energy of the system, for during this time we saw a sharp decline in the slope of the average voltage level of the battery set. In the slope chart below, this steep decline is shown by line B-C.

Day 6 : On the last day of Exp. 13.1, I modified the resistance back up to a high resistance, with lower wheel speed, and again the slope flattened out to a slope similar to that seen on days 2-4. The last jump upward in average voltage is a bit misleading. It is accurate. But one must bear in mind that this was the upper end of the saw-blade shape curve, which would have been immediately followed by a drop in average voltage in the next rotation, to a point slightly lower than the low point preceding it, followed by yet another gradual climb, followed by another drop, etc.

Slopes Calculation
Image:SDA Bedini SG Exp14.2 and 13.1 Slopes.gif

Slopes

No load, steady state discharge: -0.0055 v / day

A-B smallest slope of rotating batteries load: -0.0151 v / day

A-C overall slope of rotating batteries load: -0.0326 v / day

B-C steepest slow of rotating batteries during faster wheel rpm: -0.157 v / day

Observations :

For whatever reason, the average voltage during the rotation experiment begins much higher than the steady-state non-load curve.

Discussion

Posts to Bedini_SG Group During Experiment

brief update of my recent experimentation Dec. 10.

report: Continuous Rotation of Conditioned Batteries Nov. 30 report of Exp. 13.1

Conclusions

The higher resistance, with lower wheel rotation speed, produced the superior results in Experiment 13.1.

The slope of the gradual decline in average voltage during times of the higher resistance in the circuit (lower rotation speed), is quite close to the slope of the steady-state decline with no load or charge during a comparable time, as seen in Exp. 14.2.

The starting high in average voltage at the beginning of Exp. 13.1 seems to be a peculiar attribute of the Bedini SG-supercharged batteries, as seen at the end of Exp. 14.1 just prior to Exp. 14.2 when the batteries were hit with a load by the Battery Capacity Analyzer, and yet their average voltage was higher after than it was before.

The rate of decline of average voltage seen during times of high circuit resistance and low wheel rotation speed is close enough to the rate of decline during steady state discharge with no load or charge to suggest that external energy is going into the circuit (e.g. radiant energy / Tesla stuff) to maintain the wheel rotation. Until we calculate the frictional losses of the wheel rotation, we cannot say this definitively, but one can estimate that more energy would be required to maintain the wheel rotation during that time than was expended as reflected by the gradual decline in average voltage being less than what might be expected.

Experimental Set-up

This particular experiment did not directly involve using the Directory:Bedini SG:Schematic and Directory:Bedini SG:Assembly Instructions, but was an adjunct to Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:Sterling Allan that did.

Procedure

#Ten 6-V Panasonic 4.2Ah batteries supercharged one at a time (Exp. 14.1), accomplished Nov. 30 through Dec. 3 in the following sequence: Battery #7,10,11,2,1,8,9,4,6,5.

#After last battery was [http://peswiki.com/index.php/Directory:Bedini_SG:Operating_Instructions#Supercharging|supercharged], I then let the ten batteries sit for six days (Dec. 3-10), taking voltage readings periodically (1 to 3 times a day).

Materials

Ten 6V Panasonic-BSG 4.2Ah/20h sealed lead acid batteries part number LC-R064R2P from Digikey.com.

Data Sheet | photo | catalogue

(two) Multimeter by GB Instrumbents, GDT-11. Used to measure volts. Double checked by the UNI-T multimeter.

Multimeter by UNI-T, Model UT60A, with accuracy of three digits to the right of the decimal point for current readings.

Optical/digital tachometer by MPJa.com (DT2234A)

See also

Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:Sterling Allan:Data:Exp13 Continuous Rotation of Conditioned Batteries - Report of the experiment preceding this one.

Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:Sterling Allan

Directory:Bedini SG:Replications:PES:Sterling Allan

Directory:Bedini SG

Directory:Bedini SG:Materials | Directory:Bedini SG:Schematic | Directory:Bedini SG:Assembly Instructions | Directory:Bedini SG:Data

Directory:Bedini SG:Replications

Bedini SG egroup

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- Main Page

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